TATP Teaching Excellence Award – the Shortlist

It is with great pleasure (and excitement) that we can announce this year’s short list candidates for the 2012 TATP Teaching Excellence Award:

Abdul Abyab, Department of Mathematics & Computational Sciences
Guillaume Barlet, Department of Geology
Lauren Beard, Department of Comparative Literature
Danielle DeSouza, Department of Occupational Therapy
Shaghayegh Esfahani, Materials Science & Engineering
Keira Galway, Faculty of Music
Stefana Gargova, Department of Germanic Languages
Emily Holland, Department of Anthropology
Helen Marshall, Department of English
Sara Osenton, Department of East Asian Studies
Julia Su, Department of Linguistics
Robertson Williamson, Department of Biology

This year, we received 433 online nominations from students and 48 nominations from faculty. A total of 197 TAs were nominated with 63 TAs eligible for the short list.

The TATP Teaching Excellence Award is in it’s 9th year (it was established in 2003 and the first awards were presented in 2004). Recipients of the award receive a certificate, an honorarium and a luncheon in their honour. They also sit on a panel during that year’s TA Day (held before fall term starts) and participate in a Q&A with new (and some returning) TAs at the university. I will admit that every year I worry that no one will have a question for the award winners (and I should admit that I have this fear every time I participate in a Q&A) but every year we have more than enough to fill the allotted time, and then some.

Winners will be announced on Monday, April 30, 2012.

Jen O’Leary, Molecular Genetics & Siyu Liu, Electrical & Computer Engineering
2011 TA Award winners

 

NMC Horizon Report

by Ryan Green, Educational Technology Liaison, CTSI

The NMC Horizon Report: 2012 Higher Education Edition came out a few weeks ago, and I thought it would be a good idea to put together a quick run down of what it contains. The New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative identify six technologies they see as having a potential impact on higher education over the next five years. They are divided into three categories based on how long it will be before they could be widely adopted: near-term horizon, mid-term horizon, and far-term horizon. The team behind the report state that it is not a predictive tool, and is meant to highlight emerging technologies with considerable potential for areas of education.

Key Trends
The Horizon report also identifies key trends that they considered to be the drivers of educational technology adoptions over the period of the report. The six ranked trends are:

  1. People expect to be able to work, learn, and study whenever and wherever they want to.
  2. The technologies we use are increasingly cloud-based as notions of IT support are decentralized.
  3. The world of work is increasingly collaborative, driving changes in the way student projects are structured.
  4. The abundance of resources and relationships easily accessible via the internet increasingly challenges us to revisit our roles as educators.
  5. Education paradigms are shifting to include online learning, hybrid learning and collaborative models.
  6. There is a new emphasis in the classroom on more challenge-based and active learning.

Near-Term Horizon – One year or less:

Mobile Apps
The Horizon report identifies two key factors about mobile apps. There are many to choose from and they are inexpensive (compared to desktop software), which allows individuals to economically customize their device (whether smartphone or tablet) to their own interests. Numerous apps are available to support students inside and outside of the classroom. They provide resources for collaborating with other students or to engage with class materials. Many institutions have, or are in the process of developing, their own apps, ranging from communicating breaking campus news and accessing library material to creating custom apps for individual courses or programs. Continue reading